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Organ Donation Myths and Facts

Organ Donation Myths and Facts

On 7 Nov 2016, in

Sometimes, myths and misperceptions about organ donation can prevent someone from signing up.  You can help save lives by learning and sharing these myths and facts.

 

Myth:

I have a medical condition, so I can't be a donor.

 

Fact:

Anyone, regardless of age or medical history, can sign up to be a donor. The transplant team will determine at an individual's time of death whether donation is possible. There are very few conditions that would prevent a person from becoming a donor — such as HIV infection, active cancer or a systemic infection. You should still consider registering. Even with an illness, you may be able to donate your organs or tissues.

 

Myth:

I'm too old to be a donor.

 

Fact:

There's no age limit to organ donation. To date, the oldest donor in the U.S. was 92. What matters is the health and condition of your organs when you die.

 

Myth:

I don't think my religion supports donation.

 

Fact:

Most major religions in the U.S. support organ donation and consider donation as the final act of love and generosity toward others. 

 

Myth:

My family won't be able to have an open casket funeral if I'm a donor.

 

Fact:

An open casket funeral is usually possible for organ, eye and tissue donors. Through the entire donation process, the body is treated with care, respect and dignity.

 

Myth:

My family will have to pay for the donation.

 

Fact:

There is no cost to donors or their families for organ or tissue donation.

 

Myth:

Rich or famous people on the waiting list get organs faster.

 

Fact:

A national computer system matches donated organs to recipients. The factors used in matching include blood type, time spent waiting, other important medical information, how sick the person is and geographic location. Race, income and celebrity are NEVER considered.

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